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Refining the controller for EMILY, an ocean rescue robot

Brandon Lipjanic working on the controller that will allow manual or automatic operation of EMILY. The Emergency Integrated Lifesaving Lanyard, or EMILY, isn’t fazed by stormy weather, cold water or rough surf. With a top speed of 22 mph, the remote-control rescue buoy can reach endangered swimmers up to six times faster than a human lifeguard and handle up to six people at a time, a feature that proved its worth when the robot aided in the 2015 rescue of 300 Syrian migrants near the Greek island of Lesbos.

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Filename
ua-engineering-design-program-10.jpg
Copyright
Martha Retallick
Image Size
2848x4288 / 5.5MB
Contained in galleries
University of Arizona Engineering Design Program
Brandon Lipjanic working on the controller that will allow manual or automatic operation of EMILY. The Emergency Integrated Lifesaving Lanyard, or EMILY, isn’t fazed by stormy weather, cold water or rough surf. With a top speed of 22 mph, the remote-control rescue buoy can reach endangered swimmers up to six times faster than a human lifeguard and handle up to six people at a time, a feature that proved its worth when the robot aided in the 2015 rescue of 300 Syrian migrants near the Greek island of Lesbos.